Category: Medieval Football & Hurling

Manx Cammag North v South on St. Stephen’s Day 2015-Present

Results

YearWinnersRunners-Up
2015North7South1
Manx Cammag North v South on St. Stephen’s Day 2015-Present [Reference: 1-2]

About

Manx Cammag is a version of Hurling (or Caman in Irish) played in the Isle of Man, where Manx Gaelic was traditionally spoken. It is also very similar to the Scottish game of Shinty or Camanachd.

The earliest mention of Hurling or Caman is in the Irish ‘Book of Leinster’ in the 12th Century AD. It played with a small ball and hooked stick.

Kit Gawne, writing in his book, ‘Isle of Man Hockey’ suggests the game may have been introduced by missionaries, although the earliest mention in the Isle of Man records is not until 1760.

It is a Winter Sport, with special matches arranged on St. Stephen’s Day (such as the one between North & South of the Island.

There are few rules, and any number of players can play on either side, with coats or sticks marking goalposts.

The match on St. Stephen’s Day between North & South is played in conjunction with the Festivities associated with the day, such as ‘Hunting the Wren’, although these days no wren is killed, and those making donations to charity are given a coloured ribbon, rather than a wren’s feather, supposed to bring good luck for the following year, thought to be particularly efficacious in the event of a shipwreck or witchcraft.

Manx Cammag North v South on St. Stephen's Day 2015 in the Isle of Man
Manx Cammag North v South on St. Stephen’s Day 2015 in the Isle of Man [Reference: 3][Photo Credit: North American Manx Association]

Reference:

Websites:

[1] North American Manx Association (2015) “Rain doesn’t stop play on St. Stephen’s Day” [Internat] Available from: http://namanx.org/rain-doesnt-stop-play-on-st-stephens-day-2 [Accessed 5 March 2017]

[2] isleofman.com (2017) “Work off your Christmas Turkey with a game of Cammag!” [Internet] Available from: https://www.isleofman.com/lifestyle/health-sports/cammag/ [Accessed 13 October 2017]

Images

[1] North American Manx Association (2015) “DSCF2438” [Internat] Available from: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-4Yay0i0iKzc/VoK2Kbk6aOI/AAAAAAAABiU/19fGAhbeWwM/s1600/DSCF2438%2B%25282%2529.JPG [Accessed 11 November 2020]

Acknowledgements:

Thanks to Stephen Fitzpatrick & John Doody

About this document

Researched, Compiled and Written by Enda Mulcahy for the

Eirball | GAA World Archive

Last Updated: 11 November 2020

(c) Copyright Enda Mulcahy and Eirball 2019-2020

You may quote this document in part provided that proper acknowledgement is given to the authors. All Rights Reserved.

Cornish Hurling Town v Country Shrove Tuesday at St Columb 1950-2005

Winners 1950-2005

YearShrove Tuesday Winning TeamWinning Player
1950CountryDenis Ellery
1951TownDesmond Stephens
1952TownPat Morris
1953CountryTony Williams
1954TownGeorge Roseveare
1955CountryGraham Wills
1956TownTony Hawkey
1957CountryMichael Weldhen
1958CountryMichael Weldhen
1959TownIvan Smith
1960CountryMichael Weldhen
1961TownTony Hawkey
1962TownMichael Tabb
1963Town & CountryLost Ball !
1964TownGary Hawken
1965CountryMichael Weldhen
1966TownRichard Rundle
1967TownIvan Smith
1968TownDavid Green
1969CountryMichael Weldhen
1970TownAllan Chapman
1971TownGeoffrey Cole
1972CountryMichael Weldhen
1973TownDavid Osborne
1974CountryRobert Weldhen
1975CountryRobert Weldhen
1976CountryRobert Weldhen
1977TownMike Hitchens
1978TownBrian Hellings
1979TownTony Parkin
1980TownTony Parkin
1981TownBill Scott
1982TownStuart Nicholas
1983TownDarren Austerfield
1984CountryRobert Weldhen
1985TownBill Scott
1986TownIain Robinson
1987TownDavid Rogers
1988CountryRobert Weldhen
1989CountryRundle Weldhen
1990CountrySean Johns
1991CountryRobert Weldhen
1992CountryRobert Weldhen
1993TownSid Bennett
1994TownMark Windebank
1995CountryPhilip Ellery
1996CountryAlex Cole
1997TownJamie Lomax
1998TownDarren Hawkey
1999TownSean Johns
2000TownMark Coleman
2001TownMark Coleman
2002TownPhil Morris
2003TownSean Johns
2004TownNick Gregory
2005CountryAdam Ellery

History

Every Shrove Tuesday in St. Columb’s, Cornwall, the game of Hurling is played between ‘Town’ and ‘Country’. The night before resembles a ghost town as all the shops are boarded up and shuttered before the game is played the next day. There are no limits to the numbers of players in the game, with each player playing for either the ‘Town’ or ‘Country’. The game kicks off with the words “Town and Country do your best. but in this parish I must rest.”.

Traditionally, the game was played between the men of St. Columb, but is now played by the children. [3]

The Game can last a few minutes or it can last hours depending on how quickly the winning team can get the ball to the goal. The winning player who carries the ball to the goal has the option of keeping the ball and paying for a new one by a local craftsman. On the 4th March 2003 Sean Johns won it for the ‘Town’, his third time winning it. In 2002 Scot Bennett became the youngest ever winner, at 11-years-of-age. After the match is over another tradition is partaken , when the silver ball is dipped in the winners drink. [1]

The ball is constructed traditionally, out of silver with an applewood core, taken from a local orchard.

References

________________________________________________________

Websites

[1] BBC Cornwall (2003) Hurling at St. columb in the 21st Century [Internet] Available from; http://www.bbc.co.uk/cornwall/villages/stories/stcolumb_hurling.shtml [Accessed 7 March 2018]

[2] The Beehive | Internet Archive (2006) Hurling Winners 1950-2005 [Internet] Available from: https://web.archive.org/web/20060218093026/http://beehive.thisiscornwall.co.uk/default.asp?WCI=SiteHome&ID=661&PageID=73544 [Accessed 13 June 2019]

[3] St. Ives Web Community TV (2013) The St. Ives Feast and the Silver Ball [Internet] Available from: https://web.archive.org/web/20130819100810/http://stivestv.co.uk/whatson/feast_day_2013.htm [Accessed 13 June 2019]

Acknowledgements

Thanks to Ciaran Columb.

About this document

Researched, compiled and written by Enda Mulcahy for the

Eirball | Irish North American & World Sports Archive

Last Updated: 10 November 2020

(c) Copyright Enda Mulcahy and Eirball 2019-2020

You are may quote this document in part provided that proper acknowledgement is given to the authors. All Rights Reserved.

FJSTNV Championnat Choule Crosse Normande 2019

Jeux Tradi Normandie Logo [Reference: 1]

Classement

TeamPtsViquets
Choule Hâot Cotentin64116
Val De Risle- la chouque3557
Exo Nourmaundie Choule3440
Choule Hâot Cotentin 22041
1066 CAEN46
Choule en Caux38
FJSTNV Championnat Choule Crosse Normande 2019 [Reference: 2]

Report

Choule Hâot Cotentin won the Championnat Choule Crosse Normande 2019 with 64 Points. It is interesting to note a team called 1066 CAEN, 1066 A.D. being the year the Normans invaded Britain, an event commemorated in the Bayeux Tapestry.

Choule match at Crosse in Normandy [Reference: 5][Picture Credit: Fédération de Jeux et Sports Traditionnels Normande et Vikings]

About

The Fédération de Jeux et Sports Traditionnels Normande et Vikings runs competitons in the Traditional Sports of Normandy (North France) and the Vikings who settled there.

From Wikipedia: “La soule, later choule or sioule, is a traditional team sport that originated in Normandy and Picardy. The ball, called a soule, could be solid or hollow and made of either wood or leather. Leather balls would be filled with hay, bran, horse hair or moss.”

References

[1] Fédération de Jeux et Sports Traditionnels Normande et Vikings (2014) logotradinormandiedetoure [Internet] Available from: https://jeuxtradinormandie.files.wordpress.com/2014/11/logotradinormandiedetoure.png [Accessed 23 October 2020]

[2] Fédération de Jeux et Sports Traditionnels Normande et Vikings (2020) Councours/Championnats (challenges et contest) [CHAMPIONNAT CHOULE CROSSE NORMANDE 2019] [Internet] Available from: http://jeuxtradinormandie.fr/ [Accessed 23 October 2020]

[3] Fédération de Jeux et Sports Traditionnels Normande et Vikings (2020) DESCRIPTIF DES JEUX [Internet] Available from: http://jeuxtradinormandie.fr/ [Accessed 23 October 2020]

[4] Wikipedia (2020) La Soule [Internet] Available from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_soule [Accessed 23 October 2020]

Images

[5] Fédération de Jeux et Sports Traditionnels Normande et Vikings (2020) 11181806_668958876542486_2900937163927614507_n [Internet] Available from: https://jeuxtradinormandie.files.wordpress.com/2014/11/11181806_668958876542486_2900937163927614507_n.jpg?w=341&h=256 [Accessed 23 October 2020]

Acknowledgements

Thanks to Dervla Mulcahy & Nora Mulcahy

About this document

Researched, compiled and written by Enda Mulcahy for the

Eirball | Irish North American and World Sports Archive

Last Updated: 23 October 2020

(c) Copyright Enda Mulcahy and Eirball 2020

You may quote this document in part provided that proper acknowledgement is given to the authors. All Rights Reserved.

Manx Cammag | North v South on St. Stephen’s Day

Results

YearWinnersRunners-Up
2015North7South1

About

Manx Cammag is a version of Hurling (or Caman in Irish) played in the Isle of Man, where Manx Gaelic was traditionally spoken. It is also very similar to the Scottish game of Shinty or Camanachd.

The earliest mention of Hurling or Caman is in the Irish ‘Book of Leinster’ in the 12th Century AD. It played with a small ball and hooked stick.

Kit Gawne, writing in his book, ‘Isle of Man Hockey’ suggests the game may have been introduced by missionaries, although the earliest mention in the Isle of Man records is not until 1760.

It is a Winter Sport, with special matches arranged on St. Stephen’s Day (such as the one between North & South of the Island.

There are few rules, and any number of players can play on either side, with coats or sticks marking goalposts.

The match on St. Stephen’s Day between North & South is played in conjunction with the Festivities associated with the day, such as ‘Hunting the Wren’, although these days no wren is killed, and those making donations to charity are given a coloured ribbon, rather than a wren’s feather, supposed to bring good luck for the following year, thought to be particularly efficacious in the event of a shipwreck or witchcraft.

Reference:

Websites:

[1] North American Manx Association (2015) “Rain doesn’t stop play on St. Stephen’s Day” [Internat] Available from: http://namanx.org/rain-doesnt-stop-play-on-st-stephens-day-2 [Accessed 5 March 2017]

[2] isleofman.com (2017) “Work off your Christmas Turkey with a game of Cammag!” [Internet] Available from: https://www.isleofman.com/lifestyle/health-sports/cammag/ [Accessed 13 October 2017]

Acknowledgements:

Thanks to Stephen Fitzpatrick & John Doody

About this document

Researched, Compiled and Written by Enda Mulcahy for the

Eirball | GAA World Archive

Last Updated: 16 May 2019

(c) Copyright Enda Mulcahy and Eirball 2019

You may quote this document in part provided that proper acknowledgement is given to the authors. All Rights Reserved.

Cornish Hurling Town v Country Shrove Tuesday at St. Columb 1950-2005

Winners 1950-2005

YearShrove Tuesday Winning TeamWinning Player
1950CountryDenis Ellery
1951TownDesmond Stephens
1952TownPat Morris
1953CountryTony Williams
1954TownGeorge Roseveare
1955CountryGraham Wills
1956TownTony Hawkey
1957CountryMichael Weldhen
1958CountryMichael Weldhen
1959TownIvan Smith
1960CountryMichael Weldhen
1961TownTony Hawkey
1962TownMichael Tabb
1963Town & CountryLost Ball !
1964TownGary Hawken
1965CountryMichael Weldhen
1966TownRichard Rundle
1967TownIvan Smith
1968Town David Green
1969CountryMichael Weldhen
1970TownAllan Chapman
1971TownGeoffrey Cole
1972CountryMichael Weldhen
1973TownDavid Osborne
1974CountryRobert Weldhen
1975CountryRobert Weldhen
1976CountryRobert Weldhen
1977TownMike Hitchens
1978TownBrian Hellings
1979TownTony Parkin
1980TownTony Parkin
1981TownBill Scott
1982TownStuart Nicholas
1983TownDarren Austerfield
1984CountryRobert Weldhen
1985TownBill Scott
1986TownIain Robinson
1987TownDavid Rogers
1988CountryRobert Weldhen
1989CountryRundle Weldhen
1990CountrySean Johns
1991CountryRobert Weldhen
1992CountryRobert Weldhen
1993TownSid Bennett
1994TownMark Windebank
1995CountryPhilip Ellery
1996CountryAlex Cole
1997TownJamie Lomax
1998TownDarren Hawkey
1999TownSean Johns
2000TownMark Coleman
2001TownMark Coleman
2002TownPhil Morris
2003TownSean Johns
2004TownNick Gregory
2005CountryAdam Ellery

History

___________________________________________________________

Every Shrove Tuesday in St. Columb’s, Cornwall, the game of Hurling is played between ‘Town’ and ‘Country’. The night before resembles a ghost town as all the shops are boarded up and shuttered before the game is played the next day. There are no limits to the numbers of players in the game, with each player playing for either the ‘Town’ or ‘Country’. The game kicks off with the words “Town and Country do your best. but in this parish I must rest.”.

Traditionally, the game was played between the men of St. Columb, but is now played by the children. [3]

The Game can last a few minutes or it can last hours depending on how quickly the winning team can get the ball to the goal. The winning player who carries the ball to the goal has the option of keeping the ball and paying for a new one by a local craftsman. On the 4th March 2003 Sean Johns won it for the ‘Town’, his third time winning it. In 2002 Scot Bennett became the youngest ever winner, at 11-years-of-age. After the match is over another tradition is partaken , when the silver ball is dipped in the winners drink. [1]

The ball is constructed traditionally, out of silver with an applewood core, taken from a local orchard.

References

________________________________________________________

Websites

[1] BBC Cornwall (2003) Hurling at St. columb in the 21st Century [Internet] Available from; http://www.bbc.co.uk/cornwall/villages/stories/stcolumb_hurling.shtml [Accessed 7 March 2018]

[2] The Beehive | Internet Archive (2006) Hurling Winners 1950-2005 [Internet] Available from: https://web.archive.org/web/20060218093026/http://beehive.thisiscornwall.co.uk/default.asp?WCI=SiteHome&ID=661&PageID=73544 [Accessed 13 June 2019]

[3] St. Ives Web Community TV (2013) The St. Ives Feast and the Silver Ball [Internet] Available from: https://web.archive.org/web/20130819100810/http://stivestv.co.uk/whatson/feast_day_2013.htm [Accessed 13 June 2019]

Acknowledgements

Thanks to Ciaran Columb.

About this document

Researched, compiled and written by Enda Mulcahy for the

Eirball | Irish North American & World Sports Archive

Last Updated: 16 July 2020

(c) Copyright Enda Mulcahy and Eirball 2019-2020

You are may quote this document in part provided that proper acknowledgement is given to the authors. All Rights Reserved.